Title

The Design and use of Fluorescently Labeled Oligonucleotide Probes

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Patricia Flatt

Session Title

Biochemistry and Forensic Science

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Patricia Flatt

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Since the first characterization of fluorescence by Sir Fredrick William Herschel in 1845, scientists having been looking for ways to include fluorescence in their toolkit. Fluorescence came to microscopy with the development of the first fluorescent microscopes by Zeiss and Reichart at the turn of the 20th century. In the 1940’s fluorescently tagged antibodies were developed and used to label proteins and cell structures, lighting the way for sub-cellular research. Another method that has been developed to label gene activity and specific rRNA sequences is the use of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. These probes are sequences of cDNA that are complimentary to sequences of mRNA or rRNA allowing for highly specific labeling. Our review poster covers is covering the design and use of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes for the identification of microbes using species and phylum specific rRNA sequences as targets for the probes.

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May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

The Design and use of Fluorescently Labeled Oligonucleotide Probes

WUC Pacific Room

Since the first characterization of fluorescence by Sir Fredrick William Herschel in 1845, scientists having been looking for ways to include fluorescence in their toolkit. Fluorescence came to microscopy with the development of the first fluorescent microscopes by Zeiss and Reichart at the turn of the 20th century. In the 1940’s fluorescently tagged antibodies were developed and used to label proteins and cell structures, lighting the way for sub-cellular research. Another method that has been developed to label gene activity and specific rRNA sequences is the use of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. These probes are sequences of cDNA that are complimentary to sequences of mRNA or rRNA allowing for highly specific labeling. Our review poster covers is covering the design and use of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes for the identification of microbes using species and phylum specific rRNA sequences as targets for the probes.