Title

Nest/Egg Temperatures in Relation to Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) Cygnet Survivorship in the Yellowstone Ecosystem

Date

5-26-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Kristin Latham

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jeff Snyder

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) were once widely distributed throughout North America. Population declines during the 19th and 20th Centuries were due to overhunting and habitat loss. By the 20th Century 70 swans were found in the Yellowstone Ecosystem. Although conservation efforts continued through the 20th Century cygnet survivorship in the Yellowstone Flock declined due to food limitation, weather, diseases, abnormalities, emaciation, predation, and parasites. Our objectives were to: (1) determine fertility rates for eggs in swan nests at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge (Yellowstone Ecosystem) and (2) quantify their nest/egg incubation temperatures. We placed four artificial eggs (with temperature data loggers) in four trumpeter nests during 2015 breeding season. Of these, we found differences among nests in average number of incubation recesses, average length of recesses, and average egg temperature fluctuation. We hypothesize these differences may significantly affect a cygnets’ subsequent survival probability during the three-month post-hatch rearing season.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 26th, 1:30 PM May 26th, 3:30 PM

Nest/Egg Temperatures in Relation to Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) Cygnet Survivorship in the Yellowstone Ecosystem

WUC Pacific Room

Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator) were once widely distributed throughout North America. Population declines during the 19th and 20th Centuries were due to overhunting and habitat loss. By the 20th Century 70 swans were found in the Yellowstone Ecosystem. Although conservation efforts continued through the 20th Century cygnet survivorship in the Yellowstone Flock declined due to food limitation, weather, diseases, abnormalities, emaciation, predation, and parasites. Our objectives were to: (1) determine fertility rates for eggs in swan nests at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge (Yellowstone Ecosystem) and (2) quantify their nest/egg incubation temperatures. We placed four artificial eggs (with temperature data loggers) in four trumpeter nests during 2015 breeding season. Of these, we found differences among nests in average number of incubation recesses, average length of recesses, and average egg temperature fluctuation. We hypothesize these differences may significantly affect a cygnets’ subsequent survival probability during the three-month post-hatch rearing season.