Title

Using Artificial Selection To Understand Directional Orientation Behavior in Drosophila

Date

5-26-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Kristin Latham

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kristin Latham

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

We are testing whether the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has an innate directional preference based on the Earth’s magnetic field and whether this preference has genetic underpinnings. We have performed 15 generations of artificial selection for directional preference using a sequential Y-maze. In the maze, flies make 10 choices of whether to go north or south, and we then select the 20 percent most extreme flies for breeding. We have bred both north-seeking and south-seeking populations using this method. Our preliminary results suggest that flies do not have a directional preference. We have begun performing multiple trials using the original population of flies, the 15th generation of north-selected flies, and the 15th generation of south-selected flies. Ultimately, this experiment will lead to a better understanding of the potential genetics of magnetic orientation and directional preference in Drosophila.

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May 26th, 1:30 PM May 26th, 3:30 PM

Using Artificial Selection To Understand Directional Orientation Behavior in Drosophila

WUC Pacific Room

We are testing whether the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has an innate directional preference based on the Earth’s magnetic field and whether this preference has genetic underpinnings. We have performed 15 generations of artificial selection for directional preference using a sequential Y-maze. In the maze, flies make 10 choices of whether to go north or south, and we then select the 20 percent most extreme flies for breeding. We have bred both north-seeking and south-seeking populations using this method. Our preliminary results suggest that flies do not have a directional preference. We have begun performing multiple trials using the original population of flies, the 15th generation of north-selected flies, and the 15th generation of south-selected flies. Ultimately, this experiment will lead to a better understanding of the potential genetics of magnetic orientation and directional preference in Drosophila.