Title

Invasive Characteristics of Geranium robertianum

Date

5-26-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Kristin Latham

Session Chair

Jeff Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ava Howard

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Invasive plant species have become an environmental concern, as they can disrupt ecosystems if left unchecked. To help control the spread of invasive species, it’s important to understand their anatomical and physiological traits, and how those traits give them an advantage over native species. We chose Geranium robertianum, an invasive plant that is found over a large portion of the Pacific Northwest. Collections from six populations were made in the summer and fall of 2015. Plants were grown in a greenhouse for three months before taking measurements. We found no significant difference in stomatal characteristics and specific leaf area, showing that there may be minimal genetic variation between the populations. Future studies will compare wild G. robertianum to this baseline data and its native competitors, to help determine which traits may increase the chances of a plant becoming invasive.

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May 26th, 1:30 PM May 26th, 3:30 PM

Invasive Characteristics of Geranium robertianum

WUC Pacific Room

Invasive plant species have become an environmental concern, as they can disrupt ecosystems if left unchecked. To help control the spread of invasive species, it’s important to understand their anatomical and physiological traits, and how those traits give them an advantage over native species. We chose Geranium robertianum, an invasive plant that is found over a large portion of the Pacific Northwest. Collections from six populations were made in the summer and fall of 2015. Plants were grown in a greenhouse for three months before taking measurements. We found no significant difference in stomatal characteristics and specific leaf area, showing that there may be minimal genetic variation between the populations. Future studies will compare wild G. robertianum to this baseline data and its native competitors, to help determine which traits may increase the chances of a plant becoming invasive.