Title

The Effects of Daily Work-Family-School Demands on Mood: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Non-traditional Students

Date

5-26-2016 10:15 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Santiam Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Deborah Brannan

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

According to the National Center for Education Statistics (2013), 48 percent of all new and returning students are considered nontraditional. Consequently, there are a record number of students who are managing multiple roles. In this study we utilized mixed methods with the goal of understanding the influence of daily demands on moods. Moreover, we examined how social support might serve as a protective function for students. Initial qualitative data revealed that work and school demands involved lack of time and interference. Next, daily dairy results suggested that on days when school demands were high, participants were more likely to report feeling distress (b=-.08. p=.03), scared (b=-.09. p=.03), and nervous (b=-.11. p=.001). However, when work demands were high, participants reported higher levels of nervousness (b=-.08. p=.01) and loneliness (b=-.05. p=.04). Interestingly, received and perceived support did not moderate these models, thus suggesting that these demands are unique and prevailing.

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May 26th, 10:15 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

The Effects of Daily Work-Family-School Demands on Mood: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Non-traditional Students

WUC Santiam Room

According to the National Center for Education Statistics (2013), 48 percent of all new and returning students are considered nontraditional. Consequently, there are a record number of students who are managing multiple roles. In this study we utilized mixed methods with the goal of understanding the influence of daily demands on moods. Moreover, we examined how social support might serve as a protective function for students. Initial qualitative data revealed that work and school demands involved lack of time and interference. Next, daily dairy results suggested that on days when school demands were high, participants were more likely to report feeling distress (b=-.08. p=.03), scared (b=-.09. p=.03), and nervous (b=-.11. p=.001). However, when work demands were high, participants reported higher levels of nervousness (b=-.08. p=.01) and loneliness (b=-.05. p=.04). Interestingly, received and perceived support did not moderate these models, thus suggesting that these demands are unique and prevailing.