Title

Talk This Way: Group Language Usage as an Indicator of Group Creativity

Date

5-26-2016 9:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 9:45 AM

Location

WUC Santiam Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

David Foster

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This study examined whether language styles of group members could be used to develop an index of group creativity. Participants in 92 triads completed two problem-solving scenarios, rank ordering objects in order of importance for group survival. Language style was examined by analyzing the transcribed verbal content of the groups’ discussions using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software. Independent coders assessed creativity by counting the number of times group members engaged in fluency, originality, integration or evaluation. Unique language patterns were associated with each type of creative behavior. Fluency was positively correlated with the use of prepositions, causal, tentative and exclusive language. Originality was positively correlated with second person pronouns, prepositions, causal and inhibitory language. Integration was positively correlated with big words, third person plural pronouns and inclusive language. Evaluation was positively correlated with big words, verbs, auxiliary verbs, exclusive language and negations. A creativity index, derived from groups’ language usage profiles, significantly predicted group performance. Implications will be discussed.

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May 26th, 9:30 AM May 26th, 9:45 AM

Talk This Way: Group Language Usage as an Indicator of Group Creativity

WUC Santiam Room

This study examined whether language styles of group members could be used to develop an index of group creativity. Participants in 92 triads completed two problem-solving scenarios, rank ordering objects in order of importance for group survival. Language style was examined by analyzing the transcribed verbal content of the groups’ discussions using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software. Independent coders assessed creativity by counting the number of times group members engaged in fluency, originality, integration or evaluation. Unique language patterns were associated with each type of creative behavior. Fluency was positively correlated with the use of prepositions, causal, tentative and exclusive language. Originality was positively correlated with second person pronouns, prepositions, causal and inhibitory language. Integration was positively correlated with big words, third person plural pronouns and inclusive language. Evaluation was positively correlated with big words, verbs, auxiliary verbs, exclusive language and negations. A creativity index, derived from groups’ language usage profiles, significantly predicted group performance. Implications will be discussed.