Title

The Effects of Video Game Genre on Gender Stereotypes

Date

5-26-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Video game genre and how it impacts gender stereotypes has not been heavily researched, as past studies have primarily focused on video games and self-esteem, gender roles, and how gamers interact with each other. The current study aimed to understand how genre and the gender of a player would affect other’s perceptions using a between subjects design. It was predicted that female players would be rated more likely to play traditionally feminine or casual games. Forty participants were recruited, randomly assigned to one of two groups, read a personality description of a player, male or female, and then rated how likely the player would enjoy each of six games (Animal Crossing, Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask, Fire Emblem: Awakening, Monster Hunter, Professor Layton, & Mario Kart) on a 6-point Likert-type scale (1=very unlikely; 6=very likely). Results indicated that the female player was rated significantly more likely to play the traditionally feminine games than the male player, t(38)=3.31, p=.002, two-tailed, r²=.22. The hypothesis was supported and relates to past research in that women are perceived differently than men within the gaming community.

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May 26th, 1:30 PM May 26th, 3:30 PM

The Effects of Video Game Genre on Gender Stereotypes

WUC Pacific Room

Video game genre and how it impacts gender stereotypes has not been heavily researched, as past studies have primarily focused on video games and self-esteem, gender roles, and how gamers interact with each other. The current study aimed to understand how genre and the gender of a player would affect other’s perceptions using a between subjects design. It was predicted that female players would be rated more likely to play traditionally feminine or casual games. Forty participants were recruited, randomly assigned to one of two groups, read a personality description of a player, male or female, and then rated how likely the player would enjoy each of six games (Animal Crossing, Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask, Fire Emblem: Awakening, Monster Hunter, Professor Layton, & Mario Kart) on a 6-point Likert-type scale (1=very unlikely; 6=very likely). Results indicated that the female player was rated significantly more likely to play the traditionally feminine games than the male player, t(38)=3.31, p=.002, two-tailed, r²=.22. The hypothesis was supported and relates to past research in that women are perceived differently than men within the gaming community.