Title

The Opportunistic Function of Self-Esteem: Tuning Self-Esteem to Social Conflict

Date

5-26-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 3:30 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime M. Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to examine whether levels of self-esteem (SE) affected how people perceived social conflict. Based upon the sociometer theory of SE and evidence found within social judgment and decision-making, I predicted that (1) low trait SE individuals will view social conflict more negatively than high trait SE individuals, and (2) individuals with lowered state SE will view social conflict more negatively than raised state SE. Additionally, the magnitude of change in perceived negativity of the target social conflict will be greater for low trait SE individuals than for high trait SE individuals. Participants were first given the Rosenberg (1965) SE inventory. This was followed by either an easy or hard test with positive or negative feedback respectively—intended to raise or lower state SE. Participants then viewed a film clip showing social conflict, and were given a one-item questionnaire assessing their perceived negativity of the target social conflict. A 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance will be conducted, and implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 26th, 1:30 PM May 26th, 3:30 PM

The Opportunistic Function of Self-Esteem: Tuning Self-Esteem to Social Conflict

WUC Pacific Room

The aim of the current study was to examine whether levels of self-esteem (SE) affected how people perceived social conflict. Based upon the sociometer theory of SE and evidence found within social judgment and decision-making, I predicted that (1) low trait SE individuals will view social conflict more negatively than high trait SE individuals, and (2) individuals with lowered state SE will view social conflict more negatively than raised state SE. Additionally, the magnitude of change in perceived negativity of the target social conflict will be greater for low trait SE individuals than for high trait SE individuals. Participants were first given the Rosenberg (1965) SE inventory. This was followed by either an easy or hard test with positive or negative feedback respectively—intended to raise or lower state SE. Participants then viewed a film clip showing social conflict, and were given a one-item questionnaire assessing their perceived negativity of the target social conflict. A 2 x 2 Analysis of Variance will be conducted, and implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.