Title

The Door Slam Heard Around the World: Reactions to A Doll House and Their Societal Implications

Date

5-26-2016 1:00 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:45 PM

Location

RA 113

Department

Theatre

Session Chair

Michael Phillips

Session Title

Theater History Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Michael Phillips

Abstract

Henrik Ibsen, oft credited as the “father of realism”, is perhaps best remembered for his masterpiece, A Doll House, a play known just as well for its plot as the incredible response it elicited upon its premiere in Copenhagen in 1879. The play’s unprecedented ending prompted a complete uproar, eventually leading to the play’s— along with playwright’s— banishment from a number of European nations, including Ibsen’s homeland, Norway (Adams). Nineteenth century Europe’s vehement reaction to A Doll House is significant in more than its magnitude alone, however. In analyzing the reasoning behind the outrage over A Doll House, one can glean valuable clues regarding European societal and social standards at that time. Through the analysis of 1879-1880 newspaper reviews, an image of nineteenth century Europe’s morals can be sketched. By utilizing newspaper reviews from The Royal Theatre’s 1879 premiere of A Doll House, nineteenth century Europe’s perception of women’s rights, marriage, and children can be both identified and better understood.

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May 26th, 1:00 PM May 26th, 1:45 PM

The Door Slam Heard Around the World: Reactions to A Doll House and Their Societal Implications

RA 113

Henrik Ibsen, oft credited as the “father of realism”, is perhaps best remembered for his masterpiece, A Doll House, a play known just as well for its plot as the incredible response it elicited upon its premiere in Copenhagen in 1879. The play’s unprecedented ending prompted a complete uproar, eventually leading to the play’s— along with playwright’s— banishment from a number of European nations, including Ibsen’s homeland, Norway (Adams). Nineteenth century Europe’s vehement reaction to A Doll House is significant in more than its magnitude alone, however. In analyzing the reasoning behind the outrage over A Doll House, one can glean valuable clues regarding European societal and social standards at that time. Through the analysis of 1879-1880 newspaper reviews, an image of nineteenth century Europe’s morals can be sketched. By utilizing newspaper reviews from The Royal Theatre’s 1879 premiere of A Doll House, nineteenth century Europe’s perception of women’s rights, marriage, and children can be both identified and better understood.