Title

Anticipation is Reality: How Task Anxiety Affects Test Performance

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime M. Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The present study challenged the idea that poor test performance is caused by a lack of comprehension or test preparation. Robert Merton’s theory of the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy and previous research studies explain that students who worried about their test performance prior to or while taking a test often performed badly on it. The study predictions were that (1) high levels of test anxiety will negatively affect test performance, (2) male participants will report lower anxiety levels than female participants, and (3) males will perform better than females in a high anxiety testing condition while females in the low anxiety testing condition will outperform all other participants on average. College students (male and female) took the same timed scrambled word test online after the researcher manipulated their perception of its difficulty (easy vs. hard) in order to change their anxiety levels (high vs. low). Participants reported their anxiety levels via an online survey after they completed the test. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

Anticipation is Reality: How Task Anxiety Affects Test Performance

WUC Pacific Room

The present study challenged the idea that poor test performance is caused by a lack of comprehension or test preparation. Robert Merton’s theory of the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy and previous research studies explain that students who worried about their test performance prior to or while taking a test often performed badly on it. The study predictions were that (1) high levels of test anxiety will negatively affect test performance, (2) male participants will report lower anxiety levels than female participants, and (3) males will perform better than females in a high anxiety testing condition while females in the low anxiety testing condition will outperform all other participants on average. College students (male and female) took the same timed scrambled word test online after the researcher manipulated their perception of its difficulty (easy vs. hard) in order to change their anxiety levels (high vs. low). Participants reported their anxiety levels via an online survey after they completed the test. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.