Title

Self-Esteem in Response to Feedback Type and Word Recall

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime M. Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The current study examined the effects of feedback type and self-esteem on the type of words recalled. It was predicted that (1) participants would recall more positive words after receiving favorable feedback than unfavorable feedback, (2) feedback type would affect the number of positive words high self-esteem participants recalled more so than the number of positive words low self-esteem participants recalled, (3) participants would recall more negative words after receiving unfavorable feedback than favorable feedback, and (4) feedback type would affect the number of negative words low self-esteem participants recalled more so than the number of negative words high self-esteem participants recalled. Participants completed a self-esteem scale, followed by a 5-question logic test where they were given either positive or negative feedback regardless of their actual score. They were told to memorize a list of 40 words (20 positive, 20 negative) for one minute, and write down as many words they could recall. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

Self-Esteem in Response to Feedback Type and Word Recall

WUC Pacific Room

The current study examined the effects of feedback type and self-esteem on the type of words recalled. It was predicted that (1) participants would recall more positive words after receiving favorable feedback than unfavorable feedback, (2) feedback type would affect the number of positive words high self-esteem participants recalled more so than the number of positive words low self-esteem participants recalled, (3) participants would recall more negative words after receiving unfavorable feedback than favorable feedback, and (4) feedback type would affect the number of negative words low self-esteem participants recalled more so than the number of negative words high self-esteem participants recalled. Participants completed a self-esteem scale, followed by a 5-question logic test where they were given either positive or negative feedback regardless of their actual score. They were told to memorize a list of 40 words (20 positive, 20 negative) for one minute, and write down as many words they could recall. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.