Title

The Traditionalistic Culture: Suppressing Political Participation

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Politics, Policy, and Administration

Session Chair

Eliot Dickinson

Session Title

Political Science

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Eliot Dickinson

Abstract

In 2016, the U.S. will elect a new president. The most important components of this electoral process are the citizens and their right to participate. Daniel Elazar, author of American Federalism: A View From the States (1966), presented a political culture theory that addresses many characteristics of states, including political participation, which puts states into one of three categories: moralistic culture, individualistic culture, and traditionalistic culture. Based on Elazar’s definition of political culture, this study examines whether or not states with a traditionalistic culture are predisposed to pass legislation that aims to suppress the political participation of citizens both in the process of registering to vote and the act of voting. In determining if predisposition exists, former and current legislation that attempts to suppress voters from participating was analyzed and compared. After establishing how each element influences voter participation, a predisposition was found to exist. The implication is that states with a dominant traditionalistic culture will continue to attempt to pass legislation that suppresses voters.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

The Traditionalistic Culture: Suppressing Political Participation

WUC Pacific Room

In 2016, the U.S. will elect a new president. The most important components of this electoral process are the citizens and their right to participate. Daniel Elazar, author of American Federalism: A View From the States (1966), presented a political culture theory that addresses many characteristics of states, including political participation, which puts states into one of three categories: moralistic culture, individualistic culture, and traditionalistic culture. Based on Elazar’s definition of political culture, this study examines whether or not states with a traditionalistic culture are predisposed to pass legislation that aims to suppress the political participation of citizens both in the process of registering to vote and the act of voting. In determining if predisposition exists, former and current legislation that attempts to suppress voters from participating was analyzed and compared. After establishing how each element influences voter participation, a predisposition was found to exist. The implication is that states with a dominant traditionalistic culture will continue to attempt to pass legislation that suppresses voters.