Title

The Influence of Tempo Speed Changes and Music Context on Learning and Recall

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This study examined how changes in tempo speed affected arousal and how these changes in both tempo and arousal affected context-dependent memory. It was hypothesized that participants exposed to music with the same tempo speeds in both the learning and recall stages of the experiment would have better recall performance than those exposed to music with different tempo speeds during the two stages of the experiment. It was also hypothesized that participants exposed to music with faster tempos would report higher levels of arousal, which would then be associated with higher levels of recall performance. The hypotheses were not supported by the results, but there still were slight differences in the results. The mean of arousal self-evaluation was slightly higher in the slower tempo condition than in the faster tempo condition, and the mean of recall performance in the first recall task was slightly higher in the slower tempo condition than in the faster tempo condition. Future research could combine more than one element of music to examine the effect on learning and recall.

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May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

The Influence of Tempo Speed Changes and Music Context on Learning and Recall

WUC Pacific Room

This study examined how changes in tempo speed affected arousal and how these changes in both tempo and arousal affected context-dependent memory. It was hypothesized that participants exposed to music with the same tempo speeds in both the learning and recall stages of the experiment would have better recall performance than those exposed to music with different tempo speeds during the two stages of the experiment. It was also hypothesized that participants exposed to music with faster tempos would report higher levels of arousal, which would then be associated with higher levels of recall performance. The hypotheses were not supported by the results, but there still were slight differences in the results. The mean of arousal self-evaluation was slightly higher in the slower tempo condition than in the faster tempo condition, and the mean of recall performance in the first recall task was slightly higher in the slower tempo condition than in the faster tempo condition. Future research could combine more than one element of music to examine the effect on learning and recall.