Title

Senior Philosophy Thesis Presentation: Democracy and the Problem of Distributive Justice

Date

5-26-2016 1:00 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:30 PM

Location

WUC Calapooia Room

Department

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Session Chair

Susan Daniel

Session Title

Daniel

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Susan Daniel

Abstract

In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls delivers a persuasive clarification of the problem of distributive justice in a democratic society. According to Rawls, the actions necessary to reduce inequalities in the distribution of property “never seem to have been seriously entertained.” Rawls’ identification of the deficiencies in democratic institutions lead to questions about the appropriate function of government in insuring economic fairness as a proviso of liberty. Therefore, the pressing question implicit in the problem of distributive justice presents itself as: Does the government have a compulsory responsibility in insuring economic fairness for its citizens? If so, is this a consequence of respecting the value of liberty? Furthermore, how should property be distributed, and are there other values applicable in evaluating justice from a philosophical point of view? It is my intention to explain, clarify, and answer the preceding questions surrounding problems of distributive justice. This will culminate in my contention that the pressing questions of distributive justice are best answered through an analysis of the writings of Rawls.

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May 26th, 1:00 PM May 26th, 1:30 PM

Senior Philosophy Thesis Presentation: Democracy and the Problem of Distributive Justice

WUC Calapooia Room

In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls delivers a persuasive clarification of the problem of distributive justice in a democratic society. According to Rawls, the actions necessary to reduce inequalities in the distribution of property “never seem to have been seriously entertained.” Rawls’ identification of the deficiencies in democratic institutions lead to questions about the appropriate function of government in insuring economic fairness as a proviso of liberty. Therefore, the pressing question implicit in the problem of distributive justice presents itself as: Does the government have a compulsory responsibility in insuring economic fairness for its citizens? If so, is this a consequence of respecting the value of liberty? Furthermore, how should property be distributed, and are there other values applicable in evaluating justice from a philosophical point of view? It is my intention to explain, clarify, and answer the preceding questions surrounding problems of distributive justice. This will culminate in my contention that the pressing questions of distributive justice are best answered through an analysis of the writings of Rawls.