Title

An Alternative Approach to Screen Time Management in Elementary Age Children

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Nursing Education (OHSU)

Session Chair

Angie Docherty

Session Chair

Patti Warkentin

Session Title

Nurses in Healthcare Delivery Systems: Process Improvement Projects

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Angela Docherty

Abstract

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes daily to screen time, mostly comprised of ‘entertainment media’ such as viewing television, watching movies, and playing video games. Excessive screen time usage in this population correlates with negative sleep effects, increased obesity, decreased physical activity, impaired cognitive/behavioral development, and lower academic performance. Research shows that school children in lower socioeconomic and Hispanic populations engage in even higher amounts of screen time and children from these populations have greater access to television, video games, and other entertainment media. Our research addresses the need to increase health literacy among elementary age students and parents regarding the effects of excessive screen time. This research led our team to develop a developmentally appropriate evidence-based tool which promotes healthy screen time activities for children ages 5 to 11 years in the Gervais School District.

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May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

An Alternative Approach to Screen Time Management in Elementary Age Children

WUC Pacific Room

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes daily to screen time, mostly comprised of ‘entertainment media’ such as viewing television, watching movies, and playing video games. Excessive screen time usage in this population correlates with negative sleep effects, increased obesity, decreased physical activity, impaired cognitive/behavioral development, and lower academic performance. Research shows that school children in lower socioeconomic and Hispanic populations engage in even higher amounts of screen time and children from these populations have greater access to television, video games, and other entertainment media. Our research addresses the need to increase health literacy among elementary age students and parents regarding the effects of excessive screen time. This research led our team to develop a developmentally appropriate evidence-based tool which promotes healthy screen time activities for children ages 5 to 11 years in the Gervais School District.