Title

The Assertion of English Royal Authority in the American Colonies: Sir Edmund Andros and the Dominion of New England

Date

5-26-2016 10:45 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 11:00 AM

Location

WUC Columbia Room

Department

History

Session Chair

Patricia Goldsworthy-Bishop

Session Title

History Senior Thesis Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Elizabeth Swedo

Abstract

English monarchs in the 17th century utilized a wide variety of tools to assert their authority and control over the English colonies in North America. The king’s primary tools in this effort was trade policy, as well as more direct seizures of power. The most direct attempt at royal rule of the colonies came with the establishment of the Dominion of New England in 1686, which encompassed most of the colonies in New England. King James II appointed Sir Edmund Andros, the proprietary governor of New York, to govern this new region. Andros’ governmental commission was first written in 1686 and then reissued with an expanded region of control in 1688. Andros’ commission provides a clear illustration of the extent of the king’s efforts to assert his authority in the American colonies by providing an explanation of Andros’ powers and authority over the Dominion of New England, as well as elaborating on the Andros’ role as the primary agent of the king’s will in the colonies. The Dominion of New England illustrates the confluence of all the primary factors behind the push for centralized colonial rule after the English Civil War, including economics and political ideals.

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May 26th, 10:45 AM May 26th, 11:00 AM

The Assertion of English Royal Authority in the American Colonies: Sir Edmund Andros and the Dominion of New England

WUC Columbia Room

English monarchs in the 17th century utilized a wide variety of tools to assert their authority and control over the English colonies in North America. The king’s primary tools in this effort was trade policy, as well as more direct seizures of power. The most direct attempt at royal rule of the colonies came with the establishment of the Dominion of New England in 1686, which encompassed most of the colonies in New England. King James II appointed Sir Edmund Andros, the proprietary governor of New York, to govern this new region. Andros’ governmental commission was first written in 1686 and then reissued with an expanded region of control in 1688. Andros’ commission provides a clear illustration of the extent of the king’s efforts to assert his authority in the American colonies by providing an explanation of Andros’ powers and authority over the Dominion of New England, as well as elaborating on the Andros’ role as the primary agent of the king’s will in the colonies. The Dominion of New England illustrates the confluence of all the primary factors behind the push for centralized colonial rule after the English Civil War, including economics and political ideals.