Title

Sex Differences in the Effect of Co-Witness Information and Suggestibility

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime M. Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

In past court cases there has been a strong reliance on eyewitness testimony. However, in recent years it has been shown that eyewitness testimony is not always reliable. Memory is malleable and can be affected in many different ways, one of which is by exposure to information from other witnesses, or co-witness information. The current study aimed to examine the effect that gender has on recall and suggestibility from co-witness information. It was predicted that females would have higher recall accuracy than males, that exposure to incorrect co-witness information would reduce accuracy of recall, and that knowing what co-witnesses remembered from an event would affect females’ accuracy of recall more strongly than males’. This study used a between-subjects design where participants were instructed to watch a video of a crime and complete a questionnaire about the video. One version of the questionnaire only had the questions. The other had additional information about the answers of other supposed participants in a column next to the questions. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.

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May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

Sex Differences in the Effect of Co-Witness Information and Suggestibility

WUC Pacific Room

In past court cases there has been a strong reliance on eyewitness testimony. However, in recent years it has been shown that eyewitness testimony is not always reliable. Memory is malleable and can be affected in many different ways, one of which is by exposure to information from other witnesses, or co-witness information. The current study aimed to examine the effect that gender has on recall and suggestibility from co-witness information. It was predicted that females would have higher recall accuracy than males, that exposure to incorrect co-witness information would reduce accuracy of recall, and that knowing what co-witnesses remembered from an event would affect females’ accuracy of recall more strongly than males’. This study used a between-subjects design where participants were instructed to watch a video of a crime and complete a questionnaire about the video. One version of the questionnaire only had the questions. The other had additional information about the answers of other supposed participants in a column next to the questions. Data will be analyzed using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Implications of the obtained findings and future directions will be discussed.