Title

Age in Relation to Endorsement of the Honeymoon Effect

Date

5-26-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:30 AM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

Jaime M. Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Jaime M. Cloud

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The current study sought to investigate whether perceptions of the honeymoon effect are consistent with the findings pertaining to it. The present study also sought to determine if perceptions of the honeymoon effect are intensified with advances in age. It was predicted that participants who read the vignette of the couple in a relationship for a shorter period of time would perceive the couple as being happier than participants who read the vignette of the couple in a relationship for a longer period of time. It was further hypothesized that younger participants (18 to 20) would perceive couples in both vignettes as being happier than would older participants (25+). An equal number of participants in each age group were randomly assigned to either the shorter or longer relationship vignette and asked to rate the perceived happiness of the fictitious couple. Data will be evaluated using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Inferences of the forthcoming results as well as directions for future study will be discussed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 26th, 8:30 AM May 26th, 10:30 AM

Age in Relation to Endorsement of the Honeymoon Effect

WUC Pacific Room

The current study sought to investigate whether perceptions of the honeymoon effect are consistent with the findings pertaining to it. The present study also sought to determine if perceptions of the honeymoon effect are intensified with advances in age. It was predicted that participants who read the vignette of the couple in a relationship for a shorter period of time would perceive the couple as being happier than participants who read the vignette of the couple in a relationship for a longer period of time. It was further hypothesized that younger participants (18 to 20) would perceive couples in both vignettes as being happier than would older participants (25+). An equal number of participants in each age group were randomly assigned to either the shorter or longer relationship vignette and asked to rate the perceived happiness of the fictitious couple. Data will be evaluated using a 2x2 Analysis of Variance. Inferences of the forthcoming results as well as directions for future study will be discussed.