Title

Groundwater and Climate Change

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Geography

Session Chair

Mark M. Van Steeter

Session Title

Geography: Climate Change

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Mark Van Steeter

Abstract

Groundwater accounts for one third of all freshwater withdrawals on earth. It is an important resource for a variety of human activities, including agriculture. Groundwater can be a renewable resource if withdrawals and seepage of water is equaled or excelled by recharge. Anthropogenic climate change is altering key processes that affect groundwater, including precipitation patterns, evapotranspiration, vegetation, and sea level rise. Human activities related to water are also changing in response to a warmer climate, altering groundwater sources even more. There will be regional variability; certain areas at certain times will experience net increases or net losses in groundwater supplies as the many changes come into effect. This variability means that the ability to predict how certain aquifers will respond is limited, yet essential. A case study of the Cowichan Watershed in British Columbia illustrates these complexities.

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May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

Groundwater and Climate Change

WUC Pacific Room

Groundwater accounts for one third of all freshwater withdrawals on earth. It is an important resource for a variety of human activities, including agriculture. Groundwater can be a renewable resource if withdrawals and seepage of water is equaled or excelled by recharge. Anthropogenic climate change is altering key processes that affect groundwater, including precipitation patterns, evapotranspiration, vegetation, and sea level rise. Human activities related to water are also changing in response to a warmer climate, altering groundwater sources even more. There will be regional variability; certain areas at certain times will experience net increases or net losses in groundwater supplies as the many changes come into effect. This variability means that the ability to predict how certain aquifers will respond is limited, yet essential. A case study of the Cowichan Watershed in British Columbia illustrates these complexities.