Title

Vocal Fry as a Marker of Modern Feminine Identity

Date

5-26-2016 10:30 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 10:45 AM

Location

WUC Willamette Room

Department

English, Writing and Linguistics

Session Chair

Uma Shrestha

Session Chair

Thomas Rand

Session Title

Literature, Linguistics and Writing

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Uma Shrestha

Abstract

Vocal fry, the distinctly creaky voice quality that occurs in the lowest vocal registers, has recently become prevalent in modern speech. Over time its perception has shifted from one of masculine power and authority to its modern status as an identity marker among young urban women. This presentation examines two key schools of thought relating to the sociolinguistic implications of vocal fry as it relates to gender representation and the construction of identity in the modern world. The first of these representations is the view of vocal fry as an attempt to establish oneself as an authority figure through the use of language, particularly in academic and professional settings. The second approach examines the common perceptions of vocal fry as a marker of young, inexperienced women and the highly negative connotations attributed thereto. These two approaches to the sociolinguistic study of vocal fry will be presented in comparison with one another to draw larger conclusions regarding the expression and perception of identity in relation to language production.

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May 26th, 10:30 AM May 26th, 10:45 AM

Vocal Fry as a Marker of Modern Feminine Identity

WUC Willamette Room

Vocal fry, the distinctly creaky voice quality that occurs in the lowest vocal registers, has recently become prevalent in modern speech. Over time its perception has shifted from one of masculine power and authority to its modern status as an identity marker among young urban women. This presentation examines two key schools of thought relating to the sociolinguistic implications of vocal fry as it relates to gender representation and the construction of identity in the modern world. The first of these representations is the view of vocal fry as an attempt to establish oneself as an authority figure through the use of language, particularly in academic and professional settings. The second approach examines the common perceptions of vocal fry as a marker of young, inexperienced women and the highly negative connotations attributed thereto. These two approaches to the sociolinguistic study of vocal fry will be presented in comparison with one another to draw larger conclusions regarding the expression and perception of identity in relation to language production.