Title

Signed Language Interpreting in Healthcare Settings: Who is Qualified?

Date

5-26-2016 4:00 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 5:00 PM

Location

WUC Santiam Room

Department

Deaf Studies and Professional Studies

Session Chair

Michael Olivier

Session Title

Topics in American Sign Language, Interpreting, Deaf Education, and Mental Health

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Vicki Darden

Abstract

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) states that access to an interpreter is a deaf person’s right, but without a national certification for signed language interpreters who work in health care settings that law is hardly enforced within the medical field and has caused a myriad of issues. Negative experiences with multiple communication breakdowns have resulted from family members and friends taking on the role of an interpreter; deaf persons simply not being provided an interpreter; medical facilities hiring unqualified interpreters; and controversial use of video remote interpreters (VRI). The aforementioned causes of negative experience in health care scenarios, have also led to many deaf people being less inclined to seek medical care and routine appointments. Ultimately, the lack of access to qualified interpreters has affected the general health of the entire deaf community. This poster session will address the certification issues related to interpreting in healthcare settings; and the impacts that they have on both the interpreting community and the Deaf community. Included in the poster will also be recommendations as to what needs to be done to reach a solution.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 26th, 4:00 PM May 26th, 5:00 PM

Signed Language Interpreting in Healthcare Settings: Who is Qualified?

WUC Santiam Room

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) states that access to an interpreter is a deaf person’s right, but without a national certification for signed language interpreters who work in health care settings that law is hardly enforced within the medical field and has caused a myriad of issues. Negative experiences with multiple communication breakdowns have resulted from family members and friends taking on the role of an interpreter; deaf persons simply not being provided an interpreter; medical facilities hiring unqualified interpreters; and controversial use of video remote interpreters (VRI). The aforementioned causes of negative experience in health care scenarios, have also led to many deaf people being less inclined to seek medical care and routine appointments. Ultimately, the lack of access to qualified interpreters has affected the general health of the entire deaf community. This poster session will address the certification issues related to interpreting in healthcare settings; and the impacts that they have on both the interpreting community and the Deaf community. Included in the poster will also be recommendations as to what needs to be done to reach a solution.