Title

Interpreter Roles in Education

Date

5-26-2016 4:00 PM

End Time

26-5-2016 5:00 PM

Location

WUC Santiam Room

Department

Deaf Studies and Professional Studies

Session Chair

Michael Olivier

Session Title

Topics in American Sign Language, Interpreting, Deaf Education, and Mental Health

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Vicki Darden

Abstract

The roles of educational interpreters as mediators of communication have changed and may continue to change over time. Interpreters within the classroom balance language access with concept value and carry multiple roles throughout the school day. The philosophies of interpreters' roles have changed over the years as well, as displayed through many interpreting models. Maintaining a secure identity of one's own role, limits, and control options before entering the classroom is vital. Each individual is a human before she or he is an employee - interpreters are no exception to this. It is true that the communication and mediation that occurs during interpreting is not focused on the interpreter. However, interpreters may take into account that they are not invisible and there could be miscommunication without their presence. Interpreter roles within the educational setting were examined, compared, and contrasted using group studies, a personal interview, and professional research with the purpose of explaining how interpreters' roles have shifted over the years and how they impact the identity of professionals within the field today.

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May 26th, 4:00 PM May 26th, 5:00 PM

Interpreter Roles in Education

WUC Santiam Room

The roles of educational interpreters as mediators of communication have changed and may continue to change over time. Interpreters within the classroom balance language access with concept value and carry multiple roles throughout the school day. The philosophies of interpreters' roles have changed over the years as well, as displayed through many interpreting models. Maintaining a secure identity of one's own role, limits, and control options before entering the classroom is vital. Each individual is a human before she or he is an employee - interpreters are no exception to this. It is true that the communication and mediation that occurs during interpreting is not focused on the interpreter. However, interpreters may take into account that they are not invisible and there could be miscommunication without their presence. Interpreter roles within the educational setting were examined, compared, and contrasted using group studies, a personal interview, and professional research with the purpose of explaining how interpreters' roles have shifted over the years and how they impact the identity of professionals within the field today.