Title

Cremation of Remains

Date

5-26-2016 11:00 AM

End Time

26-5-2016 1:00 PM

Location

WUC Pacific Room

Department

Criminal Justice

Session Chair

Misty Weitzel

Session Title

Forensic Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Misty Weitzel

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

After attending this presentation, observers will be presented with the results of a study conducted to better understand the rate of decomposition through cremation by three different and readily available resources (wood, coal, and gasoline). This experiment’s objective is to confirm the results of studies that have already been conducted by other members of the forensic community as well as provide insight into which substances burn at a faster rate. As of now, there is a lot of information about the process in which flesh and bone are cremated, but little information on which substances burn at a faster rate. Understanding the fuel as it is tied to the rate of human decomposition will aid the investigator in estimating time since death in cases of attempted cremation. Three domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) legs were used in this experiment with both flesh and bone intact (radius/ulna/femur/fibula/phalanx). After attending this presentation, observers will leave with new knowledge of which substance out of the three that were tested (wood, coal, and gasoline) cremate remains (in this case pig legs) at a faster rate.

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May 26th, 11:00 AM May 26th, 1:00 PM

Cremation of Remains

WUC Pacific Room

After attending this presentation, observers will be presented with the results of a study conducted to better understand the rate of decomposition through cremation by three different and readily available resources (wood, coal, and gasoline). This experiment’s objective is to confirm the results of studies that have already been conducted by other members of the forensic community as well as provide insight into which substances burn at a faster rate. As of now, there is a lot of information about the process in which flesh and bone are cremated, but little information on which substances burn at a faster rate. Understanding the fuel as it is tied to the rate of human decomposition will aid the investigator in estimating time since death in cases of attempted cremation. Three domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) legs were used in this experiment with both flesh and bone intact (radius/ulna/femur/fibula/phalanx). After attending this presentation, observers will leave with new knowledge of which substance out of the three that were tested (wood, coal, and gasoline) cremate remains (in this case pig legs) at a faster rate.