Title

Characterizing the distribution of GABAergic neuons in the nervous system of terrestrial gastropod

Date

5-28-2015 4:30 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:45 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Mike Baltzley

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

While the central nervous systems of closely related species are generally conserved, there are many examples of variability in the size, number, and location of homologous neurons between species. We examined the central nervous systems of the snail Helix aspersa and the slug Prophysaon vanattae to investigate the variability between these species and to examine the variability between populations of the same species. We used immunohistochemistry to identify GABA-immunoreactive cells in the H. aspersa and P. vanattae. In H. aspersa, we found GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the buccal ganglia, as well as several clusters of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral and pedal ganglia. Our results are similar to previously published studies on a different population of H. aspersa. We are in the process of quantifying and locating cell clusters in all ganglia of the P. vanattae, but we have identified GABA-immunoreactive cell clusters in the buccal ganglia. We have also found GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral and pedal ganglia.

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May 28th, 4:30 PM May 28th, 4:45 PM

Characterizing the distribution of GABAergic neuons in the nervous system of terrestrial gastropod

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

While the central nervous systems of closely related species are generally conserved, there are many examples of variability in the size, number, and location of homologous neurons between species. We examined the central nervous systems of the snail Helix aspersa and the slug Prophysaon vanattae to investigate the variability between these species and to examine the variability between populations of the same species. We used immunohistochemistry to identify GABA-immunoreactive cells in the H. aspersa and P. vanattae. In H. aspersa, we found GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the buccal ganglia, as well as several clusters of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral and pedal ganglia. Our results are similar to previously published studies on a different population of H. aspersa. We are in the process of quantifying and locating cell clusters in all ganglia of the P. vanattae, but we have identified GABA-immunoreactive cell clusters in the buccal ganglia. We have also found GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral and pedal ganglia.