Title

Wavelengths of light and photo-response in planaria

Date

5-28-2015 4:15 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:30 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Erin Baumgartner

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Planarian flatworms are among the simplest animals to develop eyecups- made up of pigment cells and photoreceptor cells- that enable them to detect and respond to presence and direction of light. Planaria reveal a negative phototaxis, evading light, and this response may be the result of a variety of factors. Understanding how planaria respond to different wavelengths of light can show what types of stimulus result in a phototaxis response; it can also show differing degrees of the response. To answer the question of whether planaria exhibit the same phototaxis behavior to different wavelengths of light, planaria were subjected to full spectrum, red, green, blue and ultraviolet light. Ten planaria were tested per ten-minute trial with six trials per variable. Latency of first planarian arrival in the unlit side and number of planaria in and out of light at the end of each trial was recorded. ANOVA with post hoc tests, chi-square frequencies, and t-tests were performed on the data. The planaria exhibited the same phototaxis response to ultraviolet light as they did to full spectrum light but they exhibited a longer latency to ultraviolet. Planaria were less affected by red, green, and blue light then full spectrum light.

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May 28th, 4:15 PM May 28th, 4:30 PM

Wavelengths of light and photo-response in planaria

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Planarian flatworms are among the simplest animals to develop eyecups- made up of pigment cells and photoreceptor cells- that enable them to detect and respond to presence and direction of light. Planaria reveal a negative phototaxis, evading light, and this response may be the result of a variety of factors. Understanding how planaria respond to different wavelengths of light can show what types of stimulus result in a phototaxis response; it can also show differing degrees of the response. To answer the question of whether planaria exhibit the same phototaxis behavior to different wavelengths of light, planaria were subjected to full spectrum, red, green, blue and ultraviolet light. Ten planaria were tested per ten-minute trial with six trials per variable. Latency of first planarian arrival in the unlit side and number of planaria in and out of light at the end of each trial was recorded. ANOVA with post hoc tests, chi-square frequencies, and t-tests were performed on the data. The planaria exhibited the same phototaxis response to ultraviolet light as they did to full spectrum light but they exhibited a longer latency to ultraviolet. Planaria were less affected by red, green, and blue light then full spectrum light.