Title

Streptomyces Growth in Different Forest Soil

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Sarah Boomer

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram Positive, filamentous bacteria that produce spores and are important decomposers for organic material. There are over 550 species of known Streptomyces. Streptomyces are found mainly in soil and decaying vegetation, and are responsible for the earthy smell of soil. A majority of antibiotics are made by this genus. Because Streptomyces forms spores, I hypothesized that it would thrive better in drier, open habitats – as opposed to moist habitats in covered areas. Three samples were collected from three different sites in the McDonald-Dunn Research Forest (Oregon State University, College Forest). The first site was a managed, row-planted, mono-culture forest area, the second site was a diverse unmanaged forest area with heavy undergrowth, and the third site was a logged area with full sun exposure. To test my hypothesis, I grew plated each of these samples on starch media, isolated Streptomyces colonies, performed a Gram Stain on all isolates, and tested for antibiotic production. The results showed that the open, logged site had the most Streptomyces isolates, although none produced antibiotics.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

Streptomyces Growth in Different Forest Soil

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram Positive, filamentous bacteria that produce spores and are important decomposers for organic material. There are over 550 species of known Streptomyces. Streptomyces are found mainly in soil and decaying vegetation, and are responsible for the earthy smell of soil. A majority of antibiotics are made by this genus. Because Streptomyces forms spores, I hypothesized that it would thrive better in drier, open habitats – as opposed to moist habitats in covered areas. Three samples were collected from three different sites in the McDonald-Dunn Research Forest (Oregon State University, College Forest). The first site was a managed, row-planted, mono-culture forest area, the second site was a diverse unmanaged forest area with heavy undergrowth, and the third site was a logged area with full sun exposure. To test my hypothesis, I grew plated each of these samples on starch media, isolated Streptomyces colonies, performed a Gram Stain on all isolates, and tested for antibiotic production. The results showed that the open, logged site had the most Streptomyces isolates, although none produced antibiotics.