Title

Photopoint documentation of vegetational changes following invasive plant species remediation at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Bryan Dutton

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Invasive plant species such as Rubus armeniacus (Rosaceae; Himalayan blackberry), have altered habitats throughout Oregon due to resource domination. Site-specific restoration efforts often include repeated mowing of R. armeniacus, followed by herbicide treatments, with the intent of reintroduction of native species. The goal of this monitoring project was to establish a procedure so that vegetative change could be documented following habitat remediation on a circa 11-acre parcel of Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon. Restoration efforts were carried out by the Refuge staff and centered on the boundary of the plot, a creek habitat dominated by R. armeniacus. The primary data collection tool for this project was the digital photographic documentation of vegetative change through time in conjunction with Refuge staff’s remediation efforts. To accomplish this, two photo point surveys using GPS coordinates were established: one survey consisting of 60 points spaced 10 meters apart around the perimeter of the parcel, and a second survey based on 16 points interior to the first. The monitoring protocol was repeated every three to five weeks from June through December, 2014. Data was then organized, chronologically, by individual photo point using Microsoft PowerPoint to provide a visualization of vegetative change results through time following remediation efforts. Ongoing monitoring is required to assess if the removal of R. armeniacus at this site will result in long-term absence of this invader and if native species will return to, and persist in, this habitat.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

Photopoint documentation of vegetational changes following invasive plant species remediation at Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Invasive plant species such as Rubus armeniacus (Rosaceae; Himalayan blackberry), have altered habitats throughout Oregon due to resource domination. Site-specific restoration efforts often include repeated mowing of R. armeniacus, followed by herbicide treatments, with the intent of reintroduction of native species. The goal of this monitoring project was to establish a procedure so that vegetative change could be documented following habitat remediation on a circa 11-acre parcel of Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon. Restoration efforts were carried out by the Refuge staff and centered on the boundary of the plot, a creek habitat dominated by R. armeniacus. The primary data collection tool for this project was the digital photographic documentation of vegetative change through time in conjunction with Refuge staff’s remediation efforts. To accomplish this, two photo point surveys using GPS coordinates were established: one survey consisting of 60 points spaced 10 meters apart around the perimeter of the parcel, and a second survey based on 16 points interior to the first. The monitoring protocol was repeated every three to five weeks from June through December, 2014. Data was then organized, chronologically, by individual photo point using Microsoft PowerPoint to provide a visualization of vegetative change results through time following remediation efforts. Ongoing monitoring is required to assess if the removal of R. armeniacus at this site will result in long-term absence of this invader and if native species will return to, and persist in, this habitat.