Title

Maze path choice in shrimp

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Biology

Session Chair

Ava Howard

Session Chair

Jeffrey Snyder

Session Title

Research in the Biological Sciences

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Erin Baumgartner

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

My experiment was designed to see if ghost shrimp (Palaemonetes paludosus) have the ability to remember a path that led to a food reward, which may provide information on a shrimp’s ability to remember a pathway to specific locations in the wild. I used colored legos to build a simple maze where each shrimp had to make a decision between four possible path options, one with a food reward. Eleven shrimp each went through a series of five trials. I predicted that the time it took the shrimp to complete the maze would decrease with each trial and that the shrimp would show a preference for the route that led to the food reward. My results did not support either hypothesis, but reflect shrimps’ excellent visual capabilities and relatively simple brain and nervous system. The shrimp did not show a preference for the route that led to food, and there was not a decrease in time over each set of trials. An ANOVA test revealed that shrimp displayed preferences for certain paths, specifically the blue and green options. I hypothesize that their choice was influenced by the color, but further research is needed to determine this.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

Maze path choice in shrimp

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

My experiment was designed to see if ghost shrimp (Palaemonetes paludosus) have the ability to remember a path that led to a food reward, which may provide information on a shrimp’s ability to remember a pathway to specific locations in the wild. I used colored legos to build a simple maze where each shrimp had to make a decision between four possible path options, one with a food reward. Eleven shrimp each went through a series of five trials. I predicted that the time it took the shrimp to complete the maze would decrease with each trial and that the shrimp would show a preference for the route that led to the food reward. My results did not support either hypothesis, but reflect shrimps’ excellent visual capabilities and relatively simple brain and nervous system. The shrimp did not show a preference for the route that led to food, and there was not a decrease in time over each set of trials. An ANOVA test revealed that shrimp displayed preferences for certain paths, specifically the blue and green options. I hypothesize that their choice was influenced by the color, but further research is needed to determine this.