Title

The Effects of Performing Kind Acts on Psychological Well-Being

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

Research evidence suggests that recipients of compassionate acts (acts that benefit others or make others happy, typically at some cost to oneself) often derive some benefit from such acts. Little research, however, has examined the effects of compassion on those engaged in the act of kindness. It was hypothesized that those who engaged in performing acts of kindness would score higher on measures examining happiness, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and perceived stress than those who performed neutral acts. The study included 40 participants, 20 female and 20 male. Participants performed one kind act (experimental condition) or one neutral act (control condition) for a period of three days and then completed measures examining psychological well-being. It was found that those who engaged in the acts of kindness scored higher on the measures of psychological well-being than those who performed neutral acts. Further research should include other aspects of compassion such as donating to charity or volunteering to fully examine the effects of being compassionate.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

The Effects of Performing Kind Acts on Psychological Well-Being

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Research evidence suggests that recipients of compassionate acts (acts that benefit others or make others happy, typically at some cost to oneself) often derive some benefit from such acts. Little research, however, has examined the effects of compassion on those engaged in the act of kindness. It was hypothesized that those who engaged in performing acts of kindness would score higher on measures examining happiness, life satisfaction, self-esteem, and perceived stress than those who performed neutral acts. The study included 40 participants, 20 female and 20 male. Participants performed one kind act (experimental condition) or one neutral act (control condition) for a period of three days and then completed measures examining psychological well-being. It was found that those who engaged in the acts of kindness scored higher on the measures of psychological well-being than those who performed neutral acts. Further research should include other aspects of compassion such as donating to charity or volunteering to fully examine the effects of being compassionate.