Title

The Effects of Time Pressure on Test Performance

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Ethan McMahan

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

In the United States, a substantial amount of college students take multiple exams a year under time constraints. The present study examines how undergraduate college students’ performance and anxiety levels are affected by time constraints on exams. Thirty-four college students (female=23) were given a 30-question simple multiplication math test and then asked to rate their anxiety levels on a 5-point Likert type scale. It was hypothesized that the participants who are not under a time constraint while taking the test will perform significantly better than those participants who are given a specific amount of time to complete the test and that participants who are under a time constraint will experience moderately high anxiety levels. There were no significant differences between the groups’ test performance (p=0.243) and the groups’ anxiety levels (p=0.423). While the hypothesis was not supported, the study does produce noteworthy findings that can contribute to current literature. This is one of the first studies to examine anxiety levels and test performance on college students placed under time constraints. The study provides an interesting perspective on test performance and test anxiety when time limits are present.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

The Effects of Time Pressure on Test Performance

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

In the United States, a substantial amount of college students take multiple exams a year under time constraints. The present study examines how undergraduate college students’ performance and anxiety levels are affected by time constraints on exams. Thirty-four college students (female=23) were given a 30-question simple multiplication math test and then asked to rate their anxiety levels on a 5-point Likert type scale. It was hypothesized that the participants who are not under a time constraint while taking the test will perform significantly better than those participants who are given a specific amount of time to complete the test and that participants who are under a time constraint will experience moderately high anxiety levels. There were no significant differences between the groups’ test performance (p=0.243) and the groups’ anxiety levels (p=0.423). While the hypothesis was not supported, the study does produce noteworthy findings that can contribute to current literature. This is one of the first studies to examine anxiety levels and test performance on college students placed under time constraints. The study provides an interesting perspective on test performance and test anxiety when time limits are present.