Title

Word and Shape Visual Memory Recall WIth Auditory Distraction

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The recall of visual word list and visual shape list was examined in a 2 x 2 study. With four experiments total; two had no auditory distraction and two was manipulated by auditory distraction. In the first experiment it was found that visual shape recall was superior to visual word recall with auditory distraction. In the second experiment it was found that the recall of visual shapes recall was minimally superior to visual words recall with non-auditory distraction. Results were interpreted in terms of the dual coding hypothesis and indicated that visual shapes are encoded into both a visual store and an acoustic store; however, visually presented words are only encoded into an acoustic store. Auditory distraction should prevent rehearsal of information in the acoustic store but should not affect information in the visual store.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

Word and Shape Visual Memory Recall WIth Auditory Distraction

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

The recall of visual word list and visual shape list was examined in a 2 x 2 study. With four experiments total; two had no auditory distraction and two was manipulated by auditory distraction. In the first experiment it was found that visual shape recall was superior to visual word recall with auditory distraction. In the second experiment it was found that the recall of visual shapes recall was minimally superior to visual words recall with non-auditory distraction. Results were interpreted in terms of the dual coding hypothesis and indicated that visual shapes are encoded into both a visual store and an acoustic store; however, visually presented words are only encoded into an acoustic store. Auditory distraction should prevent rehearsal of information in the acoustic store but should not affect information in the visual store.