Title

The Impact of Thought Speed on Positive Mood

Date

5-28-2015 2:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 4:00 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

It was hypothesized that thought acceleration would have a direct impact on positive mood. Forty college students (29 females, 11 males) participated, and the mean age was 21 (SD= 2). A between subjects design was used, and the treatment group received problem-solving instructions that elicited fast thinking, while the instructions of the control group promoted slower thinking (Pronin, Jacobs, & Wegner, 2008). The positive mood of the subjects was measured on a rating scale (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). The results indicated that faster thinking led to a more positive mood than slower thinking. These findings suggest that fast thinking cognitive tasks influence affect.

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May 28th, 2:00 PM May 28th, 4:00 PM

The Impact of Thought Speed on Positive Mood

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

It was hypothesized that thought acceleration would have a direct impact on positive mood. Forty college students (29 females, 11 males) participated, and the mean age was 21 (SD= 2). A between subjects design was used, and the treatment group received problem-solving instructions that elicited fast thinking, while the instructions of the control group promoted slower thinking (Pronin, Jacobs, & Wegner, 2008). The positive mood of the subjects was measured on a rating scale (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). The results indicated that faster thinking led to a more positive mood than slower thinking. These findings suggest that fast thinking cognitive tasks influence affect.