Title

What Comes After an Undergraduate Degree in Psychology? Expectations and Perceptions Regarding Education and Salary for Careers in Psychology

Date

5-28-2015 9:00 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 11:00 AM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Behavioral Sciences

Session Chair

David Foster

Session Chair

Jaime Cloud

Session Title

Behavioral Sciences Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Chehalis Strapp

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This study investigated accuracy of psychology majors’ perceptions regarding the amount of schooling needed and expected annual salary for a specific career. Participants (N=136) listed a desired career, estimated the amount of schooling needed to achieve this career, and expected annual salary. Students’ perceptions were compared with information in Occupational Outlook Handbook. Results indicated student’s overestimated education needed for desired career and generally overestimated salary for this career. Upper class students were not more accurate in estimates relative to first and second year students with respect to estimates. Implications for student advising and career preparation are discussed.

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May 28th, 9:00 AM May 28th, 11:00 AM

What Comes After an Undergraduate Degree in Psychology? Expectations and Perceptions Regarding Education and Salary for Careers in Psychology

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

This study investigated accuracy of psychology majors’ perceptions regarding the amount of schooling needed and expected annual salary for a specific career. Participants (N=136) listed a desired career, estimated the amount of schooling needed to achieve this career, and expected annual salary. Students’ perceptions were compared with information in Occupational Outlook Handbook. Results indicated student’s overestimated education needed for desired career and generally overestimated salary for this career. Upper class students were not more accurate in estimates relative to first and second year students with respect to estimates. Implications for student advising and career preparation are discussed.