Title

Physical Changes in Burned Human Remains

Date

5-28-2015 11:30 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 1:30 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Criminal Justice

Session Chair

Misty Weitzel

Session Title

Bioanthropology/Forensic Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Misty Weitzel

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

The mission of the forensic anthropologist is to help identify the individual, despite what state the remains are in. Human remains are often burned or in a cremated state, and the usual osteobiographic methods may not be employable. This project is an investigation into the changes in bones that occur when exposed to fire. Domestic pig (Sus scrofa) bones will be measured, weighed, and color will be assessed before and after burning. The experiment will occur in an outdoor exposed soil pit. To observe variations of burning, temperature will also be recorded during different stages. It is our estimation that variation in temperature will result in various levels of change in the skeletal material. These changes in the bones are discussed, as well as the general purposes of learning to identify charred skeletal remains.

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May 28th, 11:30 AM May 28th, 1:30 PM

Physical Changes in Burned Human Remains

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

The mission of the forensic anthropologist is to help identify the individual, despite what state the remains are in. Human remains are often burned or in a cremated state, and the usual osteobiographic methods may not be employable. This project is an investigation into the changes in bones that occur when exposed to fire. Domestic pig (Sus scrofa) bones will be measured, weighed, and color will be assessed before and after burning. The experiment will occur in an outdoor exposed soil pit. To observe variations of burning, temperature will also be recorded during different stages. It is our estimation that variation in temperature will result in various levels of change in the skeletal material. These changes in the bones are discussed, as well as the general purposes of learning to identify charred skeletal remains.