Title

Osteobiographical Analysis of an Incomplete Skeleton

Date

5-28-2015 11:30 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 1:30 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Criminal Justice

Session Chair

Misty Weitzel

Session Title

Bioanthropology/Forensic Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Misty Weitzel

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

One of the most important tasks for a forensic anthropologists is to determine the osteobiographical information of an individual skeleton. There are many metrics that are used to determine the sex, age, ancestry, and stature. However many of these methods rely on the presence of certain bones, such as the skull or os coxa. Oftentimes, incomplete remains are found, but these osteobiographical determinations still must be made. The individual in this experiment is an incomplete skeleton consisting of twelve right ribs, twelve left ribs, the spinal column (excluding sacrum and coccyx), the sternum, and both clavicles. In this experiment we will attempt to determine the age of this incomplete set of remains by analyzing the morphology of the sternal end of the right fourth rib, as first introduced by M. Yasar Iscan et al. in 1984, and further solidified by the work of later forensic anthropologists.

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May 28th, 11:30 AM May 28th, 1:30 PM

Osteobiographical Analysis of an Incomplete Skeleton

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

One of the most important tasks for a forensic anthropologists is to determine the osteobiographical information of an individual skeleton. There are many metrics that are used to determine the sex, age, ancestry, and stature. However many of these methods rely on the presence of certain bones, such as the skull or os coxa. Oftentimes, incomplete remains are found, but these osteobiographical determinations still must be made. The individual in this experiment is an incomplete skeleton consisting of twelve right ribs, twelve left ribs, the spinal column (excluding sacrum and coccyx), the sternum, and both clavicles. In this experiment we will attempt to determine the age of this incomplete set of remains by analyzing the morphology of the sternal end of the right fourth rib, as first introduced by M. Yasar Iscan et al. in 1984, and further solidified by the work of later forensic anthropologists.