Title

The Effects of Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy on Fifth Grade Students “Word Warrior Wizardry”

Date

5-28-2015 4:30 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 6:00 PM

Location

Education (ED) 217

Department

Teacher Education

Session Chair

Alicia Wenzel

Session Chair

Carmen Cáceda

Session Chair

Holly Eckles

Session Title

MAT / MSEd Poster Session 1

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Tracy Smiles

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This study examines the impact of student self selection on vocabulary development with fifth grade students who have limited academic language. With the increased demands from Common Core Standards for students to determine meanings of academic language, it is key that students become more competent with academic vocabulary. As a class, students self selected vocabulary based upon a teacher chosen mentor text, which was followed by rigorous systematic instruction and assessment. This study presents inquiries into the ways in which student choice and rigorous vocabulary strategies effect vocabulary development, comprehension, short and long term memory, written responses, and students' attitudes and perceptions about vocabulary learning.

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May 28th, 4:30 PM May 28th, 6:00 PM

The Effects of Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy on Fifth Grade Students “Word Warrior Wizardry”

Education (ED) 217

This study examines the impact of student self selection on vocabulary development with fifth grade students who have limited academic language. With the increased demands from Common Core Standards for students to determine meanings of academic language, it is key that students become more competent with academic vocabulary. As a class, students self selected vocabulary based upon a teacher chosen mentor text, which was followed by rigorous systematic instruction and assessment. This study presents inquiries into the ways in which student choice and rigorous vocabulary strategies effect vocabulary development, comprehension, short and long term memory, written responses, and students' attitudes and perceptions about vocabulary learning.