Title

Working to Death: The Rise of Chronic Kidney Disease in Central America

Date

5-28-2015 11:30 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 1:30 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Criminal Justice

Session Chair

Misty Weitzel

Session Title

Bioanthropology/Forensic Anthropology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Shirley Heying

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

In the past two decades, over 20,000 people in Central America have died from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Alarming growth in the number of CKD victims has raised major concerns in the public health sector and the general populations of Central American countries. In my poster, I discuss the prevalence of CKD in Central America, and examine relationships between individuals afflicted by CKD—most of whom are agricultural workers—and their exposure to various agrochemicals through farm work, as well as working conditions and regional factors that attribute to CKD prevalence. Discussion suggests actions that could effectively address this escalating epidemic.

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May 28th, 11:30 AM May 28th, 1:30 PM

Working to Death: The Rise of Chronic Kidney Disease in Central America

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

In the past two decades, over 20,000 people in Central America have died from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Alarming growth in the number of CKD victims has raised major concerns in the public health sector and the general populations of Central American countries. In my poster, I discuss the prevalence of CKD in Central America, and examine relationships between individuals afflicted by CKD—most of whom are agricultural workers—and their exposure to various agrochemicals through farm work, as well as working conditions and regional factors that attribute to CKD prevalence. Discussion suggests actions that could effectively address this escalating epidemic.