Title

Reconsidering the traditional 20th century music history paradigm in light of repertoire programming in American major symphony orchestras, 1925-1935.

Date

5-28-2015 2:15 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 2:30 PM

Location

Smith Hall (SH) 122

Department

Music

Session Chair

Diane Baxter

Session Title

Excellence in Graduate and Undergraduate Music Research

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Diane Baxter

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Music textbooks, music historians, and contemporary musicologists alike tend to consider a succession of avant-garde composers (notably the Second Viennese School and their students) to be the most significant musical creators in 20th century Classical music. My research challenges that assumption on the basis of an analysis of the most frequently performed works of then-living composers by 21 major American symphony orchestras during 1925-1935, the period in which, according to the typical music history narrative, the avant-garde composers first flourished.

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May 28th, 2:15 PM May 28th, 2:30 PM

Reconsidering the traditional 20th century music history paradigm in light of repertoire programming in American major symphony orchestras, 1925-1935.

Smith Hall (SH) 122

Music textbooks, music historians, and contemporary musicologists alike tend to consider a succession of avant-garde composers (notably the Second Viennese School and their students) to be the most significant musical creators in 20th century Classical music. My research challenges that assumption on the basis of an analysis of the most frequently performed works of then-living composers by 21 major American symphony orchestras during 1925-1935, the period in which, according to the typical music history narrative, the avant-garde composers first flourished.