Title

Using Light to Understand Matter: Advances in Spectroscopic Methods

Date

5-28-2015 10:40 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 11:20 AM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arlene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Although the concepts of chemical purity and identity are fairly common knowledge, how this information is obtained might not be as well known. While there are numerous methods available for chemical identification, most modern analytical processes are spectroscopic in nature. Spectroscopy refers to the practice of manipulating matter with electromagnetic radiation and recording the spectra of the resulting electromagnetic emissions. Changes between the measured excitation and emission energies are characteristic of molecular properties. Though classical spectroscopic methods do not require large sample sizes in the conventional sense, their required size can still be quite limiting on the molecular scale. To accommodate this shortcoming, a series of enhancement methods have been developed to predictably amplify the emissions of measured molecular compounds. Two of the most well-known techniques of this analytical branch are surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 28th, 10:40 AM May 28th, 11:20 AM

Using Light to Understand Matter: Advances in Spectroscopic Methods

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Although the concepts of chemical purity and identity are fairly common knowledge, how this information is obtained might not be as well known. While there are numerous methods available for chemical identification, most modern analytical processes are spectroscopic in nature. Spectroscopy refers to the practice of manipulating matter with electromagnetic radiation and recording the spectra of the resulting electromagnetic emissions. Changes between the measured excitation and emission energies are characteristic of molecular properties. Though classical spectroscopic methods do not require large sample sizes in the conventional sense, their required size can still be quite limiting on the molecular scale. To accommodate this shortcoming, a series of enhancement methods have been developed to predictably amplify the emissions of measured molecular compounds. Two of the most well-known techniques of this analytical branch are surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.