Title

More than Machines: Cattle and Human Relationships in 17th and 18th Century Colonial America

Date

5-28-2015 1:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 1:15 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

John L. Rector

Session Title

History Senior Seminar Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Bob Reinhardt

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Even in spite of larger, overarching philosophies that all non-human animals were nothing more than machines, the farmers in 17th and 18th century Early America developed strong emotional attachments to the souls they spent countless hours with; at times more time was spent with them than with their families. These people saw cattle as vital to the environment around them, and whenever they didn’t see cattle, they pictured how much cattle would enjoy it. These farmers were interested in the cattle’s well-being, constantly concerned with their health and happiness. It became plainly obvious that these cattle were important to humans for many reasons, whether economically, as a food source, and as a companion. This naturally developed into a personal connection between farmer and cattle, to the point where the farmers showed that cattle were far more than just for food and money. They were seen as a part of the family.

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May 28th, 1:00 PM May 28th, 1:15 PM

More than Machines: Cattle and Human Relationships in 17th and 18th Century Colonial America

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Even in spite of larger, overarching philosophies that all non-human animals were nothing more than machines, the farmers in 17th and 18th century Early America developed strong emotional attachments to the souls they spent countless hours with; at times more time was spent with them than with their families. These people saw cattle as vital to the environment around them, and whenever they didn’t see cattle, they pictured how much cattle would enjoy it. These farmers were interested in the cattle’s well-being, constantly concerned with their health and happiness. It became plainly obvious that these cattle were important to humans for many reasons, whether economically, as a food source, and as a companion. This naturally developed into a personal connection between farmer and cattle, to the point where the farmers showed that cattle were far more than just for food and money. They were seen as a part of the family.