Title

Channel Modification and Restoration

Date

5-28-2015 3:00 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 3:20 PM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Department

Earth and Physical Science

Session Chair

Steve Taylor

Session Title

Perspectives in River Restoration

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Steve Taylor

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Previous decades of river restoration projects provide valuable insight on the effectiveness of channel modification techniques for the improvement of salmonid habitat. Artificial structures including constructed weirs and engineered log jams have been observed to generally increase salmonid populations over the short term. Placement of wire gabions and boulder clusters has been documented to recruit and retain high-quality spawning gravels, thus increasing the occurrence of redds. Numerous studies in the Pacific Northwest have documented that the incorporation of large woody debris (LWD) into the channel system increases hydraulic complexity and offsets losses of system function due to historic logging practice. With a 10 to 20 year design life for these engineered structures, their proper application could promote a long-term renewal of self-sustaining river processes.

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May 28th, 3:00 PM May 28th, 3:20 PM

Channel Modification and Restoration

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Previous decades of river restoration projects provide valuable insight on the effectiveness of channel modification techniques for the improvement of salmonid habitat. Artificial structures including constructed weirs and engineered log jams have been observed to generally increase salmonid populations over the short term. Placement of wire gabions and boulder clusters has been documented to recruit and retain high-quality spawning gravels, thus increasing the occurrence of redds. Numerous studies in the Pacific Northwest have documented that the incorporation of large woody debris (LWD) into the channel system increases hydraulic complexity and offsets losses of system function due to historic logging practice. With a 10 to 20 year design life for these engineered structures, their proper application could promote a long-term renewal of self-sustaining river processes.