Title

Fluvial Hydrology, Fish Passage and Sedimentation

Date

5-28-2015 2:10 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 2:30 PM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Department

Earth and Physical Science

Session Chair

Steve Taylor

Session Title

Perspectives in River Restoration

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Steve Taylor

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Many salmonid species in the Pacific Northwest spend their adult lives in the ocean, and migrate upstream for spawning and rearing. These fish require complex stream elements to accommodate all of their life-stage needs. Channel complexity is generated by sediment transport and various fluvial processes, which in turn are controlled by the hydrologic flow regime. This natural regime includes discharge, gradient, the balance of sedimentation and erosion, and the magnitude and frequency of disturbances (e.g. floods, debris flow, fires). When human activity disrupts the natural fluvial process, by direct or indirect means, it can have major repercussions not just on the channel system, but also on the local biota. For salmonid populations specifically, changes in the type of sediment deposited can make spawning environments inhospitable for salmon eggs. Additionally, barriers in the stream, usually caused by human crossings, can restrict or block salmonid migration outright, further disrupting ecological productivity.

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May 28th, 2:10 PM May 28th, 2:30 PM

Fluvial Hydrology, Fish Passage and Sedimentation

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Many salmonid species in the Pacific Northwest spend their adult lives in the ocean, and migrate upstream for spawning and rearing. These fish require complex stream elements to accommodate all of their life-stage needs. Channel complexity is generated by sediment transport and various fluvial processes, which in turn are controlled by the hydrologic flow regime. This natural regime includes discharge, gradient, the balance of sedimentation and erosion, and the magnitude and frequency of disturbances (e.g. floods, debris flow, fires). When human activity disrupts the natural fluvial process, by direct or indirect means, it can have major repercussions not just on the channel system, but also on the local biota. For salmonid populations specifically, changes in the type of sediment deposited can make spawning environments inhospitable for salmon eggs. Additionally, barriers in the stream, usually caused by human crossings, can restrict or block salmonid migration outright, further disrupting ecological productivity.