Title

Salmonid Habitat as a Guiding Principle in River Restoration

Date

5-28-2015 1:40 PM

End Time

28-5-2015 2:00 PM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Department

Earth and Physical Science

Session Chair

Steve Taylor

Session Title

Perspectives in River Restoration

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Steve Taylor

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Restoring salmonid-rearing habitat in river systems is crucial to increasing fish populations in the Pacific Northwest. An estimated 71% of healthy aquatic habitat has been degraded in the Puget Sound area, while 42% has been compromised across the entire Pacific Northwest. These fluvial habitats are imperative for animal foraging and physiological transformations. Mitigation projects should aim to restore previously existing habitats rather than creating new ones, as artificial habitats often lack natural key processes that are not sustainable over time. Restoration actions include, but are not limited to, breaching of dikes, planting vegetation, removing fill, creating side channels, and restoring floodplain hydrology. Not all salmonid species require the same conditions to thrive. Restoration projects should be designed according to the needs of specific species (e.g. Coho, Chinook, Stealhead) so that one is not harmed at the expense of another. Completed restoration projects need to be monitored to ensure that they are beneficial to the system and achieve the desired outcomes over time.

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May 28th, 1:40 PM May 28th, 2:00 PM

Salmonid Habitat as a Guiding Principle in River Restoration

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Restoring salmonid-rearing habitat in river systems is crucial to increasing fish populations in the Pacific Northwest. An estimated 71% of healthy aquatic habitat has been degraded in the Puget Sound area, while 42% has been compromised across the entire Pacific Northwest. These fluvial habitats are imperative for animal foraging and physiological transformations. Mitigation projects should aim to restore previously existing habitats rather than creating new ones, as artificial habitats often lack natural key processes that are not sustainable over time. Restoration actions include, but are not limited to, breaching of dikes, planting vegetation, removing fill, creating side channels, and restoring floodplain hydrology. Not all salmonid species require the same conditions to thrive. Restoration projects should be designed according to the needs of specific species (e.g. Coho, Chinook, Stealhead) so that one is not harmed at the expense of another. Completed restoration projects need to be monitored to ensure that they are beneficial to the system and achieve the desired outcomes over time.