Title

Examination of Surface Water Nitrate levels and Co-Located Animals in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

Date

5-28-2015 11:30 AM

End Time

28-5-2015 1:30 PM

Location

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

Department

Earth and Physical Science

Session Chair

Melinda Shimizu

Session Title

Case Studies in Geographic Information Science Application

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Melinda Shimizu

Presentation Type

Poster session

Abstract

This poster examines the correlation between surface water nitrate levels (NO3) and farm animals. Nitrate is a naturally occurring substance, however anthropogenic actions such as agriculture run-off and manure can cause higher levels of nitrates, particularly in rural areas, such as those around Monmouth and Western Oregon University. Methods used include examination of surface water close to areas used by four species of farm animals, including domestic sheep (Ovis aries), domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), domestic cows (Bos taurus), and domestic horses (Equus ferus caballus). I expect to find a correlation between animals and nitrate levels in co-located surface water.

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May 28th, 11:30 AM May 28th, 1:30 PM

Examination of Surface Water Nitrate levels and Co-Located Animals in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

Werner University Center (WUC) Pacific Room

This poster examines the correlation between surface water nitrate levels (NO3) and farm animals. Nitrate is a naturally occurring substance, however anthropogenic actions such as agriculture run-off and manure can cause higher levels of nitrates, particularly in rural areas, such as those around Monmouth and Western Oregon University. Methods used include examination of surface water close to areas used by four species of farm animals, including domestic sheep (Ovis aries), domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), domestic cows (Bos taurus), and domestic horses (Equus ferus caballus). I expect to find a correlation between animals and nitrate levels in co-located surface water.