Title

Leading Ladies: A Study of Anglo-Saxon Queenship and Identity through Conquest

Date

5-29-2014 10:00 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 10:15 AM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

David Doellinger

Session Title

History Senior Thesis Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Elizabeth Swedo and Kimberly Jensen

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

By examining the lives of Medieval English queens from the early 11th to early 12th centuries, namely Edith (wife of Edward the Confessor), Matilda II (wife of Henry I), and Emma (wife of Æthelred II and Cnut), a correlation between gender identity and national identity is revealed. The changes in national identity that inevitably accompany conquest, as seen in both the Danish and Norman conquests, mimic shifts in the lives of royal women. This allows for a close study of the larger, English identity as it relates to the personal identities of England’s queens. In depth primary source analyses of documents like the Vita Ædwardi Regis and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle inform this argument. Anglo-Saxon writings provide a contemporary understanding of Englishness, gender, and queenship as well as how such concepts are personified by these queens.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 29th, 10:00 AM May 29th, 10:15 AM

Leading Ladies: A Study of Anglo-Saxon Queenship and Identity through Conquest

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

By examining the lives of Medieval English queens from the early 11th to early 12th centuries, namely Edith (wife of Edward the Confessor), Matilda II (wife of Henry I), and Emma (wife of Æthelred II and Cnut), a correlation between gender identity and national identity is revealed. The changes in national identity that inevitably accompany conquest, as seen in both the Danish and Norman conquests, mimic shifts in the lives of royal women. This allows for a close study of the larger, English identity as it relates to the personal identities of England’s queens. In depth primary source analyses of documents like the Vita Ædwardi Regis and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle inform this argument. Anglo-Saxon writings provide a contemporary understanding of Englishness, gender, and queenship as well as how such concepts are personified by these queens.