Title

“There is No Law Here”: Vigilantism, Militarism and Metropolitanism in Coos County, Oregon 1912-1913

Date

5-29-2014 9:40 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 9:55 AM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

Department

History

Session Chair

David Doellinger

Session Title

History Senior Thesis Presentations

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Kimberly Jensen and Max Geier

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

This paper addresses the economic, political and social issues that affected the Coos County region during the period of 1912-1913 within the context of national trends in labor violence before the First World War. It specifically examines the deportations of Socialists and members of the Industrial Workers of the World in June and July 1913. Vigilantism and institutionalized militarism became the preferred methods for elite citizens of Coos County to enact extralegal justice against individuals with political ideas they deemed both un-American and contrary to the capitalist ethos that controlled the community. Metropolitanism was a process of community building that sought to make Coos Bay the premier port on the Pacific Coast through boosterism campaigns that used deportations and other forms of labor violence as a means to create an elite-centric, homogenous community identity.

Final honors thesis available for download: http://digitalcommons.wou.edu/honors_theses/3/.

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May 29th, 9:40 AM May 29th, 9:55 AM

“There is No Law Here”: Vigilantism, Militarism and Metropolitanism in Coos County, Oregon 1912-1913

Natural Sciences (NS) 103

This paper addresses the economic, political and social issues that affected the Coos County region during the period of 1912-1913 within the context of national trends in labor violence before the First World War. It specifically examines the deportations of Socialists and members of the Industrial Workers of the World in June and July 1913. Vigilantism and institutionalized militarism became the preferred methods for elite citizens of Coos County to enact extralegal justice against individuals with political ideas they deemed both un-American and contrary to the capitalist ethos that controlled the community. Metropolitanism was a process of community building that sought to make Coos Bay the premier port on the Pacific Coast through boosterism campaigns that used deportations and other forms of labor violence as a means to create an elite-centric, homogenous community identity.

Final honors thesis available for download: http://digitalcommons.wou.edu/honors_theses/3/.