Title

Geomythology: Volcanic Myths and their Geologic Significance

Date

5-29-2014 3:40 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeffrey Templeton

Session Title

“Eruptions that Shook the World” – Examining the Influence of Volcanism on the Earth System

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Jeffrey Templeton

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Geomythology is the study of oral traditions created by pre-scientific cultures to explain geologic phenomena. Geomyths describe both observed geologic events, and those that need supernatural explanation. Because humans have always sought to explain their natural surroundings, the link between geology and mythology is apparent in many cultures. Recurring themes include the origin of landforms and the significance of geologic events, such as floods, earthquakes, and volcanism. For volcanic activity, examples of datable and verifiable evidence that support accounts of specific events include Hawaii’s legends of the goddess Pele, the stories of the Oracle at Delphi, accounts of Mt. Mazama, creation legends of landforms in the British Isles, and the Greek epics of Homer and Hesiod. Although geomythology is in its infancy within the scientific community, the insight derived from oral traditions could potentially have a profound effect on the geologic record and how civilization views its relationship with geologic events.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 29th, 3:40 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

Geomythology: Volcanic Myths and their Geologic Significance

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Geomythology is the study of oral traditions created by pre-scientific cultures to explain geologic phenomena. Geomyths describe both observed geologic events, and those that need supernatural explanation. Because humans have always sought to explain their natural surroundings, the link between geology and mythology is apparent in many cultures. Recurring themes include the origin of landforms and the significance of geologic events, such as floods, earthquakes, and volcanism. For volcanic activity, examples of datable and verifiable evidence that support accounts of specific events include Hawaii’s legends of the goddess Pele, the stories of the Oracle at Delphi, accounts of Mt. Mazama, creation legends of landforms in the British Isles, and the Greek epics of Homer and Hesiod. Although geomythology is in its infancy within the scientific community, the insight derived from oral traditions could potentially have a profound effect on the geologic record and how civilization views its relationship with geologic events.