Title

Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions on Human Civilization during the Dark Ages

Date

5-29-2014 3:00 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 3:20 PM

Location

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

Department

Earth Science

Session Chair

Jeffrey Templeton

Session Title

“Eruptions that Shook the World” – Examining the Influence of Volcanism on the Earth System

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Dr. Jeffrey Templeton

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

The dark ages “dust veil event” of 536 A.D. plunged the northern hemisphere into a cold darkness that had a domino-like influence upon epidemics, food production, politics, economics, and religion across Mesoamerica, Europe, the Mediterranean, and Asia. Significant levels of sulphuric acid-rich layers found in ice cores in Greenland and Antarctica, coincide with dendrochronology data, and point to three large tropical volcanic eruptions as probable sources. Tambora and Proto-Krakatau located in the Philippines, and Ilopango in El Salvador, have independent evidence of the timing of the eruptions that occurred in the mid 6th century. The global effects were far reaching, elevating the potential role of volcanism as a major climate control and demonstrating the intimate link between human affairs and nature.

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May 29th, 3:00 PM May 29th, 3:20 PM

Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions on Human Civilization during the Dark Ages

Health and Wellness Center (HWC) 105

The dark ages “dust veil event” of 536 A.D. plunged the northern hemisphere into a cold darkness that had a domino-like influence upon epidemics, food production, politics, economics, and religion across Mesoamerica, Europe, the Mediterranean, and Asia. Significant levels of sulphuric acid-rich layers found in ice cores in Greenland and Antarctica, coincide with dendrochronology data, and point to three large tropical volcanic eruptions as probable sources. Tambora and Proto-Krakatau located in the Philippines, and Ilopango in El Salvador, have independent evidence of the timing of the eruptions that occurred in the mid 6th century. The global effects were far reaching, elevating the potential role of volcanism as a major climate control and demonstrating the intimate link between human affairs and nature.