Title

Latinos in the Media

Date

5-29-2014 10:30 AM

End Time

29-5-2014 10:45 AM

Location

Bellamy Hall (HSS) 235

Department

Sociology

Session Chair

Dean Braa

Session Title

Research and Praxis in Sociology

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Maureen Dolan

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Although the United States has experienced a 25 percent Latino population growth during the past few years, Latinos have remained invisible in the mainstream media. The purpose of this study is to examine how Latinos are portrayed in the media, and how that portrayal affects Latinos in the United States. I have examined this question through an analysis of the role of Latinos in the television sitcoms. Past research has shown that the sitcoms reflect popular cultural beliefs in American Society, and the complexity of minority assimilation. The methodology utilizes interviews, surveys and focus groups, as well as a media presentation that that I have created which includes programs such as the George Lopez sitcom, Modern Family and Weeds. The results indicate that media images have a complex impact on Latino identity formation with significant generational variation.

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May 29th, 10:30 AM May 29th, 10:45 AM

Latinos in the Media

Bellamy Hall (HSS) 235

Although the United States has experienced a 25 percent Latino population growth during the past few years, Latinos have remained invisible in the mainstream media. The purpose of this study is to examine how Latinos are portrayed in the media, and how that portrayal affects Latinos in the United States. I have examined this question through an analysis of the role of Latinos in the television sitcoms. Past research has shown that the sitcoms reflect popular cultural beliefs in American Society, and the complexity of minority assimilation. The methodology utilizes interviews, surveys and focus groups, as well as a media presentation that that I have created which includes programs such as the George Lopez sitcom, Modern Family and Weeds. The results indicate that media images have a complex impact on Latino identity formation with significant generational variation.