Title

ALS- A Conversation about "The Silent Killer"

Date

5-29-2014 3:15 PM

End Time

29-5-2014 4:00 PM

Location

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Department

Chemistry

Session Chair

Arelene Courtney

Session Title

Chemistry Capstone Seminars

Faculty Sponsor(s)

Arlene Courtney

Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, is a neuromuscular degenerative disease in which motor neuron signaling breaks down causing neuron death. Symptomatic presentation is progressive paralysis of voluntary motor function. ALS affects all races and ethnic backgrounds with a slight prevalence in males. More than 90% of cases are sporadic, having no recorded cause or gene mutation, and the remaining 10% are familial, having multiple recorded gene mutations and a family history of the disease. ALS is fatal in 100% of cases, and half of all affected individuals die within three to five years of symptom onset. By attending this seminar, an individual will gain an understanding of neuronal chemistry, the theorized causes of ALS and research limitations due to the lack of knowledge surrounding this debilitating disease. This presentation is dedicated to my Uncle Mike, who is currently living with ALS.

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May 29th, 3:15 PM May 29th, 4:00 PM

ALS- A Conversation about "The Silent Killer"

Natural Sciences (NS) 101

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, is a neuromuscular degenerative disease in which motor neuron signaling breaks down causing neuron death. Symptomatic presentation is progressive paralysis of voluntary motor function. ALS affects all races and ethnic backgrounds with a slight prevalence in males. More than 90% of cases are sporadic, having no recorded cause or gene mutation, and the remaining 10% are familial, having multiple recorded gene mutations and a family history of the disease. ALS is fatal in 100% of cases, and half of all affected individuals die within three to five years of symptom onset. By attending this seminar, an individual will gain an understanding of neuronal chemistry, the theorized causes of ALS and research limitations due to the lack of knowledge surrounding this debilitating disease. This presentation is dedicated to my Uncle Mike, who is currently living with ALS.